Login to the Computer



 

 


After turning on the computer it will go through the boot process, and then you must login before you can do anything else. Logging in using your account and password provides you access to the computer’s resources and programs. You should be on the graphical login screen similar to the one shown in Figure 1 or Figure 2.

Fedora 8 Login Screen

Figure 1: The Fedora 8 Login Screen. You can just click on your user name instead of typing it in.

Figure 1 shows the login screen for Fedora 8 Linux and Figure 2 shows the login screen for Fedora 11. Each version of Linux seems to have a different graphical login screen. The point is that they are all similar looking and have the same function. You type in or select your user ID by clicking on it and then type in your password to obtain access to the computer.

Figure 2: The Fedora 11 Login screen shows the available user IDs. This login screen is a bit different from the one in Figure 1, but it performs precisely the same function.

Figure 2: The Fedora 11 Login screen shows the available user IDs. This login screen is a bit different from the one in Figure 1, but it performs precisely the same function.

Note that beginning with Fedora 7 the available login IDs are displayed on the login screen. You can simply click on your login ID and then type your password into the password field. Prior to Fedora 7 you had to type in your user ID as well.

Changing Sessions

You can change the desktop to either GNOME or KDE at the login screen. In early versions of Fedora, as in Figure 1, the options were always available even before selecting a user for login. In recent versions, such as is Figure 2, those options are only available after selecting a user to login.

Figure 3: After selecting a user to login, the choices on the bottom panel of the login screen include an option to change the desktop.

Figure 3: After selecting a user to login, the choices on the bottom panel of the login screen include an option to change the desktop.

Figure 3 shows the login screen after selecting the user dboth for login. You can see at the bottom that there is now a menu item that allows the choice of KDE or GNOME. This choice can be made temporarily for the current session only or it can be made the default. Of course it can always be changed back again.

In general, it should never be necessary to change this, but in case you need to, it is good to know that you can do so from here. If only KDE has been installed on your computer and GNOME has not, then this menu item will not be present.

For details on how to change from one desktop to another, see the next document, Make KDE Your Default Desktop.

Login

So when you are ready to login, use one of the following procedures, depending upon whether you type in your user ID or simply select it from the list.

Login by typing your user ID

This is the procedure you will use to login if you type in your user ID.

  1. Use the mouse pointer and click on the LOGIN field. The vertical text cursor should now be blinking in that field.
  2. Enter your login user ID in the LOGIN field. This would be dboth or tuser1, for example. Your Linux administrator will provide you with your user ID.
  3. Press the Enter key.
  4. Enter your password. Remember it is case sensitive.
  5. Press the Enter key. You should see the login splash screen as shown in Figure 4 and you should see the desktop initialize. This will take several seconds. When the KDE Desktop icons and Panel appear, you are logged in and the computer is ready for you to use.

Login by selecting your user ID

This is the procedure you will use to login if you select your user ID from a list and click on it.

  1. Use the mouse pointer and click on the desired user ID. If there are more user IDs than will fit in the window, there will be a scroll bar and you can scroll through the list of users until you find the correct one.
  2. Enter your password. Remember it is case sensitive.
  3. Press the Enter key. You should see the login splash screen as shown in Figure 4 and you should see the desktop initialize. This will take several seconds. When the KDE Desktop icons and the KDE Panel appear, you are logged in and the computer is ready for you to use.

Splash Screen

Fedora 8 Login Splash Screen

Figure 4: The login splash screen shows the progress of your login.


The splash screen, shown in Figure 4, provides a little animated feedback to show you the progress of the login. Linux must perform several tasks during your login, and this splash screen allows you to see how far along the login has progressed. On a very slow computer this can help you know that something is still happening and that progress is being made.

Note that splash screens also vary from release to release and you also can choose from among several different splash screens as part of your own desktop configuration. I will show you how to configure your KDE Desktop including the splash screen in Chapter 2, Using KDE 3.5.

Your first Look at the KDE Desktop

Once the login has completed, you should see the desktop. Because I much prefer the KDE desktop over GNOME for several reasons, that is the desktop I will use for the rest of this book. The default KDE desktop for Fedora Linux looks like Figure 5.

Your KDE desktop may look different depending upon the preferences of your administrator and the policies of your organization. I usually configure the KDE desktop, particularly the KDE Panel to place my most commonly used icons on the KDE panel for easy access.

Figure 5: The default KDE 3.5 Desktop for Fedora 8 Linux. Your desktop will probably look different, especially if you or your administrator have made configuration changes.


I will discuss the KDE 3.5 and 4.X Desktop in more detail in later chapters, including configuration and customization. The KDE 4.2 desktop as it is configured for Fedora 11 is shown below in Figure 6.

Figure 6: The Fedora 11 dsktop uses KDE 4.2 which is considerably different from the KDE 3.5 desktop.

Figure 6: The Fedora 11 desktop uses KDE 4.2 which is considerably different from the KDE 3.5 desktop.

The KDE 4.2 desktop used in Fedora 11 is significantly different from the KDE 3.5 desktop used in Fedora 8 and earlier. The elements, however should all be familiar and it serves the same purpose; to allow the you the user to interact with the compute by allowing you to launch and interact with the application programs that you use to accomplish work.

The Fedora 12 desktop is very similar to the Fedora 11 desktop.