KDE Plasma 5 Disappoints in Fedora 22

KDE Opinion Reviews

Although Fedora is still my distro of choice, KDE Plasma 5 (KP5) is a real disappointment and makes Fedora 22 unusable for me. It is reminiscent of the switch from KDE 3.5 to KDE 4, where many things did not work and others were simply missing.

Understand that I am a KDE fanboy; it is my favorite desktop. But KP5 is unusable for me. Even after spending days trying to make it work to meet my needs I was unable to feel even marginally comfortable with it.

Many of the widgets that were present in KDE Plasma 4 are now missing, including a few that I really find useful such as the Konqueror profiles which enable me to use four default profiles for Konqueror and to create my own. In fact, Konqueror seems to ignore profiles now, even when I try to launch them from the command line. Perhaps the profile location has moved and the KDE 4 location no longer works; but that begs the question of why make that change. Konqueror is my favorite file manager and being unable to use my own profiles with it is nearly a deal breaker all by itself.

The multimedia configuration page in System Settings was unable to detect any of the multiple soundcards I have installed in my workstation. This failure, along with the inability to deal with my preconfigured Konqueror profiles, makes it impossible for me to work effectively in KP5.

The KP5 desktop itself is usable but flat, boring and uninspiring. Perhaps simplicity and clean looks is the watchword for this release but I don’t like it.

The real problem with this are the issues I had when trying to make the desktop look good for me. There are only two options for the default desktop look and no way to download more. There are also few icon options and again, no available downloads. KP5 does not recognize my existing wallpapers and was forcing me to import each individually.  Making changes to the desktop such as pointer schemes and various modifications to application appearance cause the desktop to crash repeatedly.

Underneath there are no major changes to Fedora 22 itself. The major changes like systemd, the new anaconda installer, and firewalld are well past. But the new Anaconda installer still sucks!

I did try to use various forms of GNOME, including Cinnamon and MATE, but I find those desktops too restrictive for me. So I went back to Fedora 21 with KDE Plasma 4 and I am now happy again. I will wait until KP5 is fixed before I upgrade to a newer version of Fedora – just as I did when KP4 made its appearance.

Ironically, this decision to revert to Fedora 21 is a reflection of my own somewhat inflexible approach to my desire for a flexible desktop experience. I like KDE Plasma 4 and the extreme flexibility it gives me. I find myself hampered and seriously annoyed by the lack of the features and flexibility in KP5 that I have grown used to in KP4 and I am unwilling to deal with those shortcomings for any length of time.

My main question is why would one release a desktop so seriously full of holes and annoyances?

More about Fedora 18

Information Linux Reviews Technical Tips and Tricks

In my review of Fedora 18, I discussed my initial impressions of that newest release. Having now begun to install Fedora 18 on several more hosts in my constantly changing world I have found some interesting under the cover changes.


A new firewall, firewalld, is now the default firewall for Fedora. Of course Fedora is the proving ground for many new things so, while this change was not particularly well documented, changes to Fedora in general should not be a surprise. The firewalld daemon is mentioned in three short paragraphs in the Fedora 18 release notes which only references the man pages for the new firewalld commands for further information, and once as being a new addition in the Technical Notes document. Both are available as PDF files from the Fedora Documentation Project.

The firewalld rules are quite complex compared to what I have been using with IPTables. This, and the fact that I am not yet familiar with the rule syntax or the overall structure of firewalld means that, for now at least, I need to revert to IPTables on my Fedora 18 hosts.

Reverting to IPTables

The good news is that the old IPTables firewall is still available until I can learn how to best create the firewall rules I need with firewalld. However it, too, has changed and some of the old IPTables rules, especially those using state related rule sets have been altered.

First, to convert back to IPTables, stop and disable the firewalld service and start and enable the iptables service.  Of course you must do this safely with your network disabled until you can get your new (old) firewall back in place. Then use the iptables-restore command to restore your old IPTables rules from the saved copy. You did save a backup copy of your IPTables firewall rules, right?

At this point, IPTables gives some errors indicating that one should use new connection tracking rules in lieu of the state-related rules. The best part is that IPTables is smart enough to give you the warning message and then translate the rules into connection tracking rules. At that point you can simply use the iptables-save command view the translated rules and redirect the output to /etc/sysconfig/iptables to save the translated rules.

So now I will take some time to learn this new firewall system while my IPTables firewall protects me.

Here is a link to the Fedora Project FirewallD documentation.